Free online course on Eliminating Trachoma

The International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness (IAPB) is an alliance of civil society organisations, corporates and professional bodies promoting eye health through advocacy, knowledge and partnerships.
Organisation: IAPB

The International Centre for Eye Health and London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine are re-running the successful free online course on Eliminating Trachoma with the help of its partners FutureLearn from October 2. The course development has been supported by The Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Trust, Sightsavers and International Coalition for Trachoma Control. You…

Project to tackle Trachoma in Pakistan

The International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness (IAPB) is an alliance of civil society organisations, corporates and professional bodies promoting eye health through advocacy, knowledge and partnerships.
Organisation: IAPB

A new project to stop the spread of the painful, blinding eye-infection trachoma was launched in Pakistan. CBM will train and support over 3000 community health workers to distribute trachoma medication directly to people’s homes. Because trachoma is highly infectious, easily passed between family members through physical contact, it is vital that whole communities are…

Closing the gap in Indigenous Eye Health in Australia

On International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples Prof Hugh Taylor writes about his work with Indigenous Eye Health in Australia. Background I first started working on trachoma and issues around the eye health of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Islander people as a young ophthalmologist in 1976 when I worked as the assistant director of the National…

Record-breaking numbers of surgeries and drug distributions result in trachoma decline

Communications Manager
Organisation: IAPB

A Trachomatous Trichiasis  (TT) Case finder examines a child’s eyes in Kenya’s Mara district. An increase in surgeries and drug distribution programmes are contributing to a steady decline in trachoma prevalence, the latest progress report from the World Health Organization Alliance for the Global Elimination of Trachoma by 2020 (GET2020 Alliance) shows. The WHO Weekly Epidemiological Record,…

World Water Day

Communications Manager
Organisation: IAPB

22nd March 2017 is World Water Day; a UN-designated ‘day’ which sees widespread support from across the world. Emphasizing WASH: Water, Sanitation and Hygiene, the day is important for the eye care sector as well.  Indeed, providing clean water not only eliminates Neglected Tropical Diseases like trachoma, it also dramatically improves general health indicators and…

Kasungu goes trachoma-free

The Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Trust

Today, on World Water Day, our focus is on how facial cleanliness and environmental improvements are helping to combat the risks of transmission and infection of trachoma.  Trachoma is the world’s leading infectious cause of blindness. It is triggered by a bacterium called Chlamydia Trachomatis which is spread through contact with eye discharge from an…

Let’s provide SAFE water

Global Director, Programmes
Organisation: OEU

On the occasion of World Water Day, Kashinath Bhoosnurmath, Alice Mwangi and Patson Tembo from Operation Eyesight Universal highlight the importance of clean water for the prevention of avoidable blindness. Sinazongwe district, Zambia notched a prevalence of blinding trachoma of 14.3%, according to a survey conducted by the Ministry of Health in 2007 (The WHO…

This World Water Day, let’s scale up sustainable trachoma elimination efforts

22 March is World Water Day, a day for raising awareness and taking action to tackle the global water crisis. Today, we highlight and celebrate some of the emerging water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH)-related initiatives that are helping to ensure that trachoma is not just eliminated, but eliminated once and for all. (Photo: Good hygiene…

Trachoma in the Western Pacific – end in sight

Regional Program Manager, IAPB Western Pacific
Organisation: IAPB

Screening for trachoma in Papua New Guinea Through strong collaborations and evidence, several governments in the Western Pacific can now claim trachoma is no longer a public health problem. For many more, trachoma elimination is in sight. So where are we with trachoma in the Western Pacific? A national assessment of trachoma conducted in Lao…